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Rodrigues et al. Fluctuating heat stress data

dataset
posted on 09.11.2021, 15:00 by Leonor RodriguesLeonor Rodrigues, Hayley A. McDermott, Irene Villanueva, Jana Djukarić, Lena C. Ruf, Mirjam AmcoffMirjam Amcoff, Rhonda R. Snook

Summary:


This data was used to assess how fluctuating sublethal heat stress during development impacted subsequent male reproductive performance and success. Using a subset of isogenic lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) reared at standardized densities in four thermal conditions (Constant 25°C, Constant 29°C, Fluctuating 25°C, Fluctuating 29°C), we quantified phenotypic (and genetic) variation in mating propensity, fertility, productivity and sex-ratio.


Files available:

We provide 2 txt files: FLUCT_mating_fertility; FLUCT_productivity_sexratio.


FLUCT_mating_fertility:

This file contains the raw data of male mating propensity and fertility under four thermal conditions.

Table headers are explained below:

LineStatus - classification based on the reproductive performance across three temperatures tested in Zwoinska et al. (2020)*. (High – lines whose fertility did not decline as temperature increased; Low – lines whose fertility declined substantially as temperature increased)

DGRP- line identity

Wolbachia- line infection status (y – infected; n- uninfected)

Haplotype- haplotypes identified in Bevers et al. (2019)*

Inv1/2/7/8/9 - the inversion status of each line for each of the main inversions characterized in the DGRP (ST = standard, INV = inversion. ST/INV = unfixed status in the line)

Temperature - mean developmental temperature experienced (25°C or 29°C)

ThermalRegime - thermal variation experienced (Const - constant or Fluct - fluctuating regime)

Vial – vial where each pair was kept

EggCollDay – day the eggs were collected and placed in one of the thermal conditions.

PairingDay – day males and females were paired

Mating – mating propensity (1, if mating observed; 0, if no mating observed)

Larvae – fertility (1, if larvae present; 0, if no larvae present)


FLUCT_productivity_sexratio:

This file contains the raw data of male productivity and sex ratio under four thermal conditions.

Table headers are explained below:

LineStatus - classification based on the reproductive performance across three temperatures tested in Zwoinska et al. 2020. (High - whose fertility did not decline as temperature increased; Low - whose fertility declined substantially as temperature increased)

DGRP- line identity

Wolbachia- line infection status (y – infected; n- uninfected)

Haplotype- haplotypes identified in Bevers et al. (2019)*

Inv1/2/7/8/9 - the inversion status of each line for each of the main inversions characterized in the DGRP (ST = standard, INV = inversion. ST/INV = unfixed status in the line)

Temperature - mean developmental temperature experienced (25°C or 29°C)

ThermalRegime - thermal variation experienced (Const - constant or Fluct - fluctuating regime)

Vial – vial where each pair was kept

EggCollDay – day the eggs were collected and placed in one of the thermal conditions.

PairingDay – day males and females were paired

Productivity – number of adult offspring produced.

Daughters – number of female offspring produced.

Sons – number of male offspring produced.

IGV – absolute deviation from the median as a measure of intra-genotypic variability.

*Bevers, R. P. J., et al (2019). Mitochondrial haplotypes affect metabolic phenotypes in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. Nature Metabolism, 1, 1226–1242. https://doi.org/10.1038/s42255-019-0147-3

Zwoinska, M. K., Rodrigues, L. R., Slate, J., & Snook, R. R. (2020). Phenotypic responses to and genetic architecture of sterility in response to sub-lethal temperature during development. Frontiers in Genetics, 11, 573. https://doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2020.00573

Funding

Carl Tryggers postdoctoral scholarship

History

Original title

Fluctuating heat stress during development exposes reproductive costs and putative benefits

Original language

English

Associated Publication

ACCEPTED in Journal of Animal Ecology

Affiliation (institution of first SU-affiliated author)

468 Zoologiska institutionen | Department of Zoology